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Colloquia

Mingquan Zhan

On s-hamiltonian-connected line graphs

Date: 10/25/2018
Time: 3:45PM-4:45PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Abstract: View

Mingquan Zhan

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-10-25

Liang Hong

On prediction of future insurance claims when the model is uncertain

Date: 10/19/2018
Time: 3:30PM-4:30PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Abstract: Predictive modeling is arguably one of the most important tasks actuaries face in their day-to-day work. In practice, actuaries may have a number of reasonable models to consider, all of which will provide different predictions. The most common strategy is to first use some kind of model selection tool to select a ``best model,'' and then use that model to make predictions. However, there is reason to be concerned about the use of the classical distribution theory to develop predictions because these ignore the selection effect. Since accuracy of predictions is crucial to the insurer's pricing and solvency, care is needed to develop valid prediction methods. In this talk, we undertake an investigation of the effects of model selection on the validity of classical prediction tools and make some recommendations for practitioners.

Liang Hong

Dr. Hong received his PhD in mathematics from Purdue University. He has received grants from the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS), Society of Actuaries (SOA), and State Farm Insurance Company; and he has given research talks at several Center for Actuarial Excellence (CAE) schools including Drake University, Georgia State University, Temple University, University of Waterloo, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-10-19

Zhi-Hong Chen

Degree conditions on induced nets for the hamiltonicity of claw-free graphs

Date: 10/11/2018
Time: 3:45PM-4:45PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

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Zhi-Hong Chen

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-10-11

Xiaofeng Gu

Packing spanning 2-connected subgraphs and spanning trees

Date: 10/05/2018
Time: 3:30PM-4:30PM
Place: 120 Armstrong Hall

Abstract:
Motivated by the well known spanning tree packing theorem by Nash-Williams and Tutte, we discover a sufficient partition condition of packing spanning 2-connected subgraphs and spanning trees. As a corollary, it is shown that every (4k+2l)-connected and essentially (6k +2l)-connected graph contains k spanning 2-connected subgraphs and l spanning trees that are pairwise edge-disjoint. Utilizing it, we show that every 6-connected and essentially 8-connected graph G contains a spanning tree T such that G−E(T) is 2-connected.

Xiaofeng Gu

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-10-05

Dana Tudorascu

Technical Challenges in the Analysis of Alzheimer's Disease Brain

Date: 10/04/2018
Time: 3:45PM-4:45PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

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Dana Tudorascu

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-10-04

Jugal Verma

Milnor numbers of hypersurface singularities, mixed multiplicities of ideals and volumes of polytopes

Date: 9/20/2018
Time: 4:00PM-5:00PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Abstract: View
If $H$ is an analytic surface defined by $f=0$ in $\mathbb C^{n+1}$ with an isolated singularity at the origin, then the colength of the Jacobian ideal $J(f)$ is called its Milnor number. B. Teissier refined this notion to a sequence of $\mu^*(H)$ Milnor numbers of intersections of $H$ with general linear spaces of dimension $i$ for $i=0,1,\dots, (n+1).$ J. J. Risler and Teissier showed that this sequence coincides with the mixed multiplicities of the maximal ideal and $J(f).$ They proposed conjectures about log-convexity of the $\mu^*(H)$ which were solved by B. Teissier, D. Rees-R. Y. Sharp and D. Katz. These give rise to Minkowski inequality and equality for the Hilbert-Samuel multiplicities of ideals. Mixed multiplicities are also connected with volumes of polytopes and hence to counting solutions to polynomial equations.

Jugal Verma

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-09-20

Bill Kazmierczak

Dr. Kazmierczak is the Calculus Coordinator at Binghamton and recently implemented "split" calculus. This means that Calculus 1 and Calculus 2 are each taught in two half semester courses, and students can drop/add midsemester courses as needed. Calculus 2A material covers integration techniques and applications, and Calculus 2B covers sequences, series, and polar coordinates. If a student starts the semester in Calculus 2A and passes, then he/she could continue on to Calculus 2B in the second half of the semester. However, if the student doesn't pass, then he/she could start Calculus 2A again during the second half of the semester and would take Calculus 2B the next semester.

We have been discussing the possibility of implementing this type of system for our calculus courses at WVU and would like to learn about Dr. Kazmierczak's experience at Binghamton University.

Please join us for the colloquium, and feel free to share this e-mail with anyone who might be interested.

Date: 09/19/2018
Time: 4:00PM-5:00PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Date, Location: 
2018-09-19

Yongwei Yao

Lech’s inequality, the Stuckrad-Vogel conjecture, and uniform behavior of Koszul homology

Date: 8/17/2018
Time: 4:00PM-5:00PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Abstract : View

Yongwei Yao

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-08-17

Tokuji Araya

An introduction to the Path Algebras

Date: 8/16/2018
Time: 4:00PM-5:00PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Abstract: View

Tokuji Araya

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-08-16

Hehui Wu

Vertex Partition with Average Degree Constraint

Date: 5/31/2018
Time: 3:00PM-4:00PM
Place: 315 Armstrong Hall

Abstract: A classical result, due to Stiebitz in 1996, states that a graph with minimum degree $s+t+1$ contains a vertex partition $(A, B)$, such that $G[A]$ has minimum degree at least $s$ and $G[B]$ has minimum degree at least $t$. Motivated by this result, it was conjectured that for any non- negative real number s and t, such that if G is a non-null graph with average degree at least $s + t + 2$, then there exist a vertex partition $(A, B)$ such that $G[A]$ has average degree at least $s$ and $G[B]$ has average degree at least $t$. Earlier, we claimed a weaker result of the conjecture that there exist two disjoint vertex set $A$ and $B$ (for which the union may not be all the vertices) that satisfy the required average degree constraints. Very recently, we fully proved the conjecture. This is joint work with Yan Wang at Facebook.

Hehui Wu

All are welcome.

Date, Location: 
2018-05-31

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